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Saturday, July 26
 

12:00pm

CBLDF: Tales from the Code-True Stories of Censorship
For more than 50 years, American comic books were subject to the censorship of the Comics Code, a system born from a time when comics were burned in the streets and blamed for all of society's ills. Though the Code is gone, its influence remains. The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund gathers Denny O'Neil, Paul Levitz, and other top storytellers who worked under the Code's strictures to tell the tales of how its censorship touched their creative visions.

Saturday July 26, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 30CDE

1:00pm

CBLDF: Banned Comics!
Bone, Fun Home, Maus, Persepolis, Sandman, Watchmen... they're not just some of the greatest comics ever made, they're also among the most frequently targeted for bans! This year's Banned Books Week celebrates comics and graphic novels and the CBLDF has everything you need to know to celebrate in your community. Jeff Smith, Gene Yang, Carol Tilley, Charles Brownstein, and others discuss how and why comics are banned and how you can fight back by participating in this year's comics-focused Banned Books Week!

Saturday July 26, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 30CDE

1:30pm

Marvel's Avengers S.T.A.T.I.O.N. Superhero Science Analysis
S.H.I.E.L.D. science advisors Ricardo Gil da Costa (Neuroverse Inc.), Preston Dyches (JPL), Randii Wessen (JPL), Leonidas Moustakis (JPL), and Sebastian Alvarado (Thwacke) will brief participants on the case files of the superheroes who make up the Avengers Initiative. For the first time, S.H.I.E.L.D. divulges some of its most confidential scientific findings on what makes these superheroes unique. Moderated by Agent Phil Plait (Bad Astronomy), this training session is for S.H.I.E.L.D. Agents at Level 4 and above.

Saturday July 26, 2014 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 5AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference Session #12: Poster Session
The CAC's poster session gives attendees the opportunity to interact directly with presenters. Come talk one on one with these scholars about their projects!

Marisa Brandt (University of California, San Diego), Erika Cheng (University of California, San Diego), and Emily York (University of California, San Diego) investigate instrumental applications of comics in domains where they are being used not only to entertain but to accomplish a goal and show that comics and their creation can have transformative effects on those who create and consume them.

Andrei Molotiu (Indiana University, Bloomington) begins Alex Toth's scholarly reevaluation with an examination of the sophisticated narrative techniques and page design he employed in his comics of the 1950s and '60s.

Allen Thomas (University of Central Arkansas) and Mara Whiteside (University of Central Arkansas) examine the relationship between readers and minority comic book characters, namely the connection a reader feels to a particular character, and discuss the future direction of comic books in regards to minority representation.

Neil Granitz (California State University, Fullerton) and Steven Chen (California State University, Fullerton) investigate what factors compel a consumer to seek out more elements of a story across different media and present strategies to increase consumers' consumption of transmedia storytelling.

Michael L. Kersulov (Indiana University) addresses data collected from a research project focused on classes in which gifted high school students created their own autobiographical comics, presenting examples of student-created comics and discussing how they worked to authenticate the students' personal narratives.

William Kuskin (University of Colorado Boulder) presents an overview of UC Boulder's MOOC "Comic Books and Graphic Novels," suggesting that when coupled with online technology, comics offer a transformative energy for humanities disciplines.

J. Scott McKinnon (Henderson State University) identifies the factors that contribute to ethnic minority characters either succeeding or failing, examining online discussions, reviews, and published articles.

Drew Morton (Texas A&M University-Texarkana) argues that the majority of motion comics are less an ontologically unique medium and more a cheaply produced synergistic text that primarily exist as a marketing tool.

Rich Shivener (Northern Kentucky University) continues critical discussions on the implications of adaptation and transmedia storytelling, especially as they relate to comics. Hannah Diaz (California State University, Fullerton) examines how superhero comics can use greater variation in costume design and body type to distinguish characters and personalities more effectively.

Nami Hatfield (University of California, Los Angeles) documents the initial development and eventual buyout of Studio Proteus, a United States manga translation company active from 1986-2004.P. Andrew Miller (Northern Kentucky University) presents how he and others pair poetry and graphic art to create lyric comics. Matt Yockey (University of Toledo) considers how the "retro" qualities of Batman '66 exploit both a nostalgic appeal for the Adam West television series and demonstrate a progressive sensibility that moves beyond regressive nostalgia. Pamela Jackson, Anna Culbertson, Michael Lapins, Katie Stapko, Markel Tumlin, and Wil Weston, members of the San Diego State University Library Comic Arts Committee, discuss SDSU's strategic "Arts Alive" initiative and highlight activities sponsored by the committee that expose students to the rich and vibrant world of comics and popular arts.

Jake Talley (San Diego State University) compares the female and minority populations in the Marvel and DC universes at various points in their histories to illustrate how their race and gender makeups have evolved over time, and compares the Big Two with younger publishers to see if the lack of decades of continuity produces a more representative character population.

Barbara Glaeser (California State University, Fullerton) and Amanda Francis (Crafton Hills College) present the rubric they designed to evaluate the level of sexuality in comics in their search for "safe" titles to use in school-based research, as well as discussing the results of their project to use those comics to teach reluctant readers.

Shawn Sellers (Western Oregon University) and Eric Bruce (Western Oregon University) investigate public health concepts found in Y: The Last Man and discuss bioethics, occupational health, and women's sexual and gender health issues in the comic.

Thomas Speelman (Calvin College) analyzes the work and career of Carl Barks, who wrote and illustrated over 500 stories for Western Publishing featuring Walt Disney characters such as Donald Duck and Scrooge McDuck.

Joyce C. Havstad (University of California, San Diego) explores what it means to be a major feminist work in order to evaluate whether Y: The Last Man ought rightfully to be considered one-and if so, whether it is a successful one.

Jeff Brain (San Francisco State University) discusses how to create a curriculum blending digital citizenship objectives, Common Core standards and superheroic storytelling into a course of study for middle school students.

Damien Tomaselli (University of KwaZulu-Natal) analyzes how the visual rhetoric of comic books continues to develop, with specific reference to digitally manipulated comic books, primarily Madefire's motion books.

Saturday July 26, 2014 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB

6:00pm

60 Years Ago: Comics on Trial
Members of Los Angeles-based Captured Aural Phantasy Theater, as a preview of their upcoming play, dramatically read excerpts from some of the offending stories and transcripts of the April 1954 Senate hearings attacking comics, highlighting a discussion led by Ben Dickow (guest lecturer, Otis College of Art) and Craig Yoe (editor, Haunted Horror comics) about how comics such as EC never were the same again.

Saturday July 26, 2014 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Room 9

7:30pm

Superheroes Are Saving Lives-for REAL!
UPDATED: Thu, Jul 24, 07:46AM
Come to the ultimate feel-good panel! The story of an uncanny team of comic book superheroes - The School of 5 and their comic books teach children the lifesaving habit of handwashing. By the end of 2014 the School of 5 will be distributed in 23 countries, translated into 19 languages in Asia and Africa and reach 120 million people. 1.7 million children die every year from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, many of which can be prevented by this simple habit. The School of 5, through the comic books created by Craig Yoe, teach children and their families the importance of handwashing with soap and water in countries like Indonesia, India, Bangladesh, Egypt, Pakistan, Ghana and Kenya. Panel participants include Eisner Award winner Craig Yoe (YoeBooks.com) and Stacie June Shelton (Lifebuoy Global Social Mission Program Manager). Prepare to be amazed - and get free comic books; bring a tissue to wipe away the super tears of joy!

Saturday July 26, 2014 7:30pm - 8:30pm
Room 26AB

8:00pm

Internet Marketing Secrets for Authors
In this seminar, author/publisher Mark O'Bannon (The Dream Crystal, The Dark Mirrors of Heaven, Aia the Barbarian, Fantasy Imperium, Better Storytelling) discusses how to create a buying frenzy, what every author ought to know about writing and marketing, and some plain talk about a simple business that often sounds complicated.

Saturday July 26, 2014 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Room 30CDE

8:00pm

The Nerd in the Classroom: Sci-fi as an Educational Tool
Education's all-things-nerd networking resource returns to Comic-Con. This year's after-school-special edition features understanding dyslexia with Max Brooks (The Harlem Hellfighters, World War Z), classroom gamification with Janina Scarlet (Alliant International University), elementary and special education with David Ross (Toronto District School Board), and English with Eric Bailey (Henderson State University). Moderating is Patrick Murphy (Fremont High, Weber State University). Topics include curriculum development strategies, national standards, and increasing student engagement. This is a great networking opportunity for professional educators and nerds alike.

Saturday July 26, 2014 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Room 28DE